Moving out renters

Moving out renters

RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE RENTER WHEN MOVING OUT

Whether your lease is up and you’re moving on to a nicer place or you’re breaking lease because you’re so desperate to leave behind the cockroaches and mildew of your present apartment, moving out is a major undertaking. It’s also a big personal step and can be very stressful to you as an individual. To avoid causing yourself further headaches than absolutely necessary, make sure to plan your move carefully and communicate successfully with your landlord about the moving process.

Clean up 

Your landlord can usually issue a cleaning fee if you leave your apartment excessively messy. Since messiness is a subjective issue, it’s better to be on the safe (i.e., clean) side and tidy up as much as possible. If you’ve been a total slob for your tenancy in the apartment, this might be rough, but if you’ve maintained decent cleanliness levels, it shouldn’t be too much of a hassle.

If possible, get as many of your belongings out of the apartment prior to cleaning. This will not only make it easier to clean, since you’ll have fewer objects to work around, but it’ll also help you get a more thorough clean and avoid being surprised by fees charged

by your landlord, who discovered a huge stain under the rug you left behind in the living room. If you want to get your deposit back, try to leave your apartment even cleaner than you found it when you moved in. That may not be possible, but it’s a good goal.

Giving notice is crucial 

This is especially if you’re breaking your lease. Even if you’re not, it’s still crucial to let your landlord know that you’re actually moving out when your lease is up. That way, your landlord can not only prepare by trying to find a new tenant for your apartment, but can also potentially assist you in finding a company cleaning services to help you clean or move out of your apartment This might help alleviate some of the stress of moving

Communication is crucial you’ll need to keep your landlord updated throughout the moving process, so he or she will be able to show the apartment to new tenants and guarantee a move-in date to the incoming individuals. Being flaky about your move-out date is not only an inconvenience for your landlord, it might also cost you some money especially if you’re not out by the first of the month, when the new tenants show up with a moving van full of furniture. Changing apartments is not something to mess around with, so be sure you can leave by the date you set for yourself.

 

Moving out doesn’t have to be a hassle unless you make it one by not planning ahead. Pick a move-out date and stick to it, make sure all your belongings are moved and all apartment surfaces are cleaned, and you’ll be good to go to your new place, with security deposit in hand and a rental record as spotless as the apartment you left behind.

Fix it

Now’s the time to own up to any damage you caused to the apartment while you were there. You might be able to get away with a temporary cover-up that will pass a quick inspection, but eventually the new tenant will uncover what you did and refuse to take responsibility. Rather than risk a messy fight in the future, simply allow for whatever you might have done to your apartment to be set right. When your landlord finds out, you’re probably in for a messy lawsuit to recover damages, not to mention a drastic decrease in your future desirability as a tenant. If you have damage to repair, do make sure to hire competent workers who’ll do a good repair job; you don’t want to be stuck with bills from both the construction crew and your landlord. You might also work directly with your apartment complex’s maintenance crew, since they’re already on-site and equipped with the tools to do the job.

 

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